Corvil
Corvil

As one article asks, will Apple Music eat through your data cap? It’s a legitimate question considering many still have wireless data plans that range between 1GB-5GB per month. One redditor found that if he streamed Apple Music one hour daily on his cellular network, he would use over 1GB worth of data.

The fact that it is 2015 and customers are still being forced to deal with data caps is astounding. For years, broadband providers have told us that usage caps were mandatory for network congestion. Then, the providers tried to claim that it was more about “fairness.”

Neither of which are remotely true. As I have noted in the past, there is no pricing plan from any broadband provider that truly saves a light user a significant amount of money. Usage-based pricing simply drives up costs for all broadband consumers.

HowardForums
HowardForums

As DSLReports puts it: If usage caps were about “fairness,” carriers would offer the nation’s grandmothers a $5-$15 a month tier that accurately reflected her twice weekly, several megabyte browsing of the Weather Channel website. Instead, what we most often see are low caps and high overages layered on top of already high existing flat rate pricing, raising rates for all users.

Then there is the fact that even while AT&T and Verizon continue to throttle customers on unlimited data plans for using smaller amounts of GB’s per month, they also continue to cling to the argument that they are doing this in the name of “network congestion.”

Yet, those same unlimited data customers are also offered the ability to “upgrade” their wireless packages to a data capped plan that offers them more GB’s per month than the amount they were being throttled at under their unlimited data plans. Huh?

AnnualBroadbandSubDataCapsGigaOM

So, is it any wonder why so many customers today continue to be nervous about video streaming events on their phone? Last year, one report found that 1 in 3 British consumers were not going to watch the upcoming World Cup on their mobile device due to poor video quality and fears of ‘bill shock’ from their wireless providers.